Skip to main content

About your Search

20120501
20120531
SHOW
Today 25
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 35
CSPAN2 24
MSNBC 22
CSPAN3 20
CSPAN 15
FOXNEWS 15
WRC (NBC) 15
CNN 14
CNNW 14
KNTV (NBC) 11
SFGTV2 11
WGN (CW) 11
WJZ (CBS) 11
KPIX (CBS) 8
KGO (ABC) 7
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 296
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 296 (some duplicates have been removed)
home, bagram being a hub or many troops returning back to the united states and i think keen to try to suggest as he said a year ago the tide of war is still receding, choosing this anniversary, the death of bin laden, the man for americans the reason why they came to afghanistan, choosing the anniversary of his death to take this narrative an extra stage forwards and explaining exactly how america will tie up the loose ends of the decades-long war and how his presence will look like in the years ahead. >> nick what is the strategic partnership agreement? it doesn't talk about funding. those say this is more about, this isn't really, some saying kind of sets out the logistics of what's going to happen over the next ten years, after 2014. >> it's very strong on symbolism, not heavy on substance. it's important for america that it was signed, that it happened because for months there were outstanding issues that made it look like it may never come to fruition. it's important it was signed ahead of this vital summit in chicago in may, where nato allies have to put forward their contrib
i'm anderson cooper. we welcome our viewers across the united states and around the globe to the special report, president obama addressing the american people from afghanistan, talking about the future of u.s. troops there and we are going to bring that to you live. >> lots of news happening now, dramatic developments covering the president's surprise visit to afghanistan like no one else can. we have our reporters in afghanistan, in pakistan, in washington, in new york, we're watching all of this unfold, our own john king will give us an inside look at what it's like to be on a secret presidential trip to a war zone. he's been on one before, our own erin burnett looks at al qaeda's future and our christiane amanpour and fareed zakariazaka. >> the president took a helicopter to kabul and signed a strategic partnership agreement with president hamid karzai. it could mark the beginning of the end of the war there. listen. >> neither americans nor the afghan people asked for this war, yet for a decade we've stood together to drive al qaeda from its camps to battle an insurge
in this field. september 11th hijackers used united states and foreign financial institutions to hold, move, and retrieve their money. they deposited money into united states accounts via wire transfers and depp sits of traveler's checks and cash that was brought from overseas. they kept funds in foreign accounts which they accessed through atmst and credit card transactions in the home land. according to the september 11th commission, the plot cost al qaeda somewhere in the range of $400,000 to $500,000, of which approximately $300,000 passed through the hijackers' bank casualties here in the united states. after the attacks, the united states publicly declared that the fight against al qaeda financing was as critical as the fight against al qaeda itself. the charge of the united states intelligence and law enforcement communities was clear -- if we choke off the terrorists' money, we limit their ability to conduct mass casualty attacks. within months of the attacks, the department of defense, the fbi, the cia, and perhaps most importantly the department of treasury launched a swift and un
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
to -- to the 209,145 soldiers and officers that were officially mustered into the bureau of the united states troops. attention was brought to how these soldiers were organized, how they fought, and what they accomplished in the civil war. attention was brought to an african descent community that fought to save the union and free themselves by enforcing the emancipation proclamation. attention was brought to -- to an organized community that planned for and executed that plan to end the tyranny of slavery and lead with the constitution and to gain the rights of citizens in league with the constitution, attention was brought to one of the best kept secrets in american history. now if the overt story of the soldiers and sailors, guides, scouts, spies, nurses, was -- was one of the best kept secrets in american history. then the covert story is a secret within a secret. within the best kept secret. and when we talk about women in the civil war, african descent women in the civil war that is another layer of one of those best kept secrets in american history. one of those untold stories. tonight
the united states is trying to see whether the device could have been detected by the full body scanners that are now deployed in many airlines, many airports for flights that are bound to the u.s. now they say they can't be certain but they suspect it's built by al qaeda's and yemen's master bombmaker, the same man who designed the underwear bomb, and also the bombs that were hidden in printer card ridge, toner cartridges that were sent on cargo planes, intercepted on flights that were destined for chicago. so it's described as a great success, chris, for intelligence, and a further sign that al qaeda in yemen still the number one plot -- number one threat to the u.s. >> let me go to andrea mitchell for the political context. if you were to blow up an airliner, flying from yemen, to the united states, filled with people from yemen, people from our side working with them, what would be the fire power politically of blowing up a plane in that route? >> well, certainly that would be -- >> okay i'm gone. >> -- a huge political explosion, as well. let me give you a few more details. as you j
other have worked together back in the 1990's?" maybe this is a complement to the united states. guest: cooperation between two countries is good. mill to mill relationships which we have lots of countries including countries that are not our closest friends, we used to have these relationships with pakistan and we stopped at our peril in our relationship with pakistan and that has declined as you are well aware relationships, especially like economic dialogue like hillary clinton and secretary of the treasury tim geithner had in beijing are very good things. what we should watch and a dangerous time his cooperative relationships where we will have competition like china and russia. that is what we should try to achieve. if we were doing and in the late 1990's, that is a good thing. host: this question is from twitter - guest: first of all, i don't call it the arabis spring. -- the arab spring. i called the arab awakening. the organizing events is the birth of the arab citizen. think about that. citizens of mellon fell other officials have not done well in egypt yes. it is an important
of enfranchising women, the united states is in the middle of the pack, you know, behind new zealand, 1893, the first western style democracy to enfranchise women, behind australia, behind great britain, ahead of portugal, 1976, ahead of kuwait, 2006. so the u.s. is sort of in the middle of the pack. and if elizabeth cady stanton had then told in 1888 that the female suffrage was something that was going to happen decades into the future i think she would have been disbelieving. she had a lot of confidence as did many other reformers that this was the right thing to do. it's interesting, however, that stanton doesn't mention the fact that women had already voted in a part of the united states. we talked about that in an earlier lecture. does any one remember where they used to vote? yeah, new jersey. they voted in new jersey for about a generation from the 1770s to the early 1800s then were disenfranchised, i think i mentioned this. they were disenfranchised because a member of the new jersey state legislature had lost a race earlier and he blamed it on women voters for some reason. it was
studies supported medical use of marijuana for treatment in the united states and no animal or human data supports the safety of marijuana for general medical use, end of quote. as required by the controlled substance act, the d.e.a. required a scientific and medical valuation and scheduling recommendation. and i quote, that marijuana, the stuff we are saying tonight -- anybody -- and you saw the "60-minute" piece, they come in, buy, they take. we are talking about doctors, the number of doctors ripping off people with objectiony continuin. the number of -- oxycotin. and go down to broward county in florida and go into the pain clinics. there are buses and planes coming down to buy it and doctors are writing prescriptions. so we are going to hide behind it? the number of doctors that ruin young people on oxycotin whereby they died, they died, the doctor says it's ok, but health and human services said, quote, marijuana has a high potential for abuse. has no accepted no medical use in the united states and lacks an acceptable level of safety. i think if this amendment passes and this becom
, here we go again, president obama was born in the united states and so the arizona secretary of state is expected to declare that president obama will be on the ballot. and in pakistan, the doctor who helped us find osama bin laden has been sent to 30 years in prison for treason. they say he betrayed pakistan by helping the c.i.a. oh, my god. maybe you ought to send the c.i.a. in to rescue the doctor get him out of prison. if we can get osama bin laden, we could get the doctor out of a pakistani prison, seems to me. so much to talk about. so much you're going to want to talk about. 1-866-55-press is our toll free number. how you join the conversation. and join our team press here. peter ogborn and dan henning and cyprian bowlding, good morning all. ready to go? >> yes sir. >> bill: we're getting close to memorial day weekend you know. >> i didn't even notice. >> bill: into the homestretch here. slowing down a bit. you can tell in the news. >> yeah. >> bill: and in the capital. people already heading ou
, to permit highly educated foreign students to stay in the united states. and when you look at the numbers, it's just extraordinary that so many of these foreign students who are the real entrepreneurs of the future are forced to go back to their home countries. >> that's right. in the united states, we have a real challenge right now. we need to strengthen science, technology, engineering, and math education programs and opportunities for americans. but we are educating tens of thousands of non-u.s. nationals who are getting master's and doctoral degrees in these programs. there are tens of thousands of jobs that our most competitive, fastest growing companies can't fill and because of our current immigration laws, we've forced these highly educated folks to go home to the countries from which they came. we won't let them stay here, start jobs or take jobs, so in a bill, a bipartisan bill that senator warner of virginia, senator rubio of florida and i introtduced earlier this week, e make a number of important changes to support small business job growth. one is to create a new class of v
consequence and he'll come to the united states. andrea, i have to also -- >> i just wanted to play a little bit of what hillary clinton said in china this morning and then have you react to it. >> all of our efforts with mr. chen have been guided by his choices and our values. and i'm pleased that today, our ambassador has spoken with him again. our embassy staff and our doctor had a chance to meet with him. and he confirms that he and his family now want to go to the united states so he can pur u his studies. >> are you satisfied because clearly hillary clinton is going to leave for bangladesh then on to india. so this is going to take a couple of days at least for the paperwork. it's going to be the immediate family, not his mother, not the extended family. i understand he's going to be coming to nyu. are you satisfied with the agreement if he able so leave in a matter of days or a short amount of time? >> it's a step in the right direction. i do believe the ball was dropped largely in the begin and this groundswell of support, it was untenable to think he would find a safe place somewher
these persons you claim as property are being used to wage war against the united states. i'm going to confiscate such property as contraband of war. and in august of 1861, congress would pass the first confiscation act that would apply to those being used in the confederate war effort. just anybody couldn't enter the camp. fort monroe, one cartoonist would call it the fort monroe doctrine, receiving the contraband. butler would allow women and children in. the children and the wives. of the soldiers, not soldiers, contraband, confiscated. he would allow them in. so you have really the first contraband camp of the war forming at fort monroe. butler would also be in association with abraham galloway as he returned to work with uncle sam. the confederates use african-american lay lor -- labor extensively. and allan pinkerton said that those were the best sources of information. those engaged in hard labor for the confederacy. those individuals, those colored men, persons of african descent are best source of information. and one african-american woman is noteworthy in the information
know there's no safe place in china. the talk should have been about getting him to the united states. not just himself, but his wife who was beaten severely overand over again, and all of those that helped him. and the chinese human right's activist that took him in her car to beijing. he is under house arrest or custody right now. there a lot of people we have concern for. unfortunately with the timeline of this summit, he was literally pushed out the door with some very vague, and i would say ineffective assurances, and now he realizes it and wants to come to the united states with his wife and friends. >> congressman, you're a politician and you have studied these situations for a long time. why would the chinese allow us to score an international propaganda victory of this sort, where we take one of their people, one of their citizens and the families who say back on a plane with our secretary of state, take them out of the country in the face of this diplomacy, to walk out with some people saying we're saving them from their own government, why would the chinese government ever
to make the call. the president of the united states is told we have someone who seems to resemble osama bin laden. the intelligence points it's osama bin laden. it's our one shot to take him out. the president can make that call. i have to believe i don't know whether every single president in the united states would have done it but it seems like just about every president given the stakes and the significance would have made that call. to me it's not a political issue. the president deserves tremendous credit for making the call. democrats and republicans praised barack obama a year ago when he made this decision including mitt romney. it's not a political issue. it's sad that it has become a political issue. >> i think what sort of sparked the debate of going back to 2007 and the back and forth was governor romney's sort of shot at former president carter. do you think that was a fair way of sort of responding that even jimmy carter when jimmy carter did order a raid like this that didn't work? >> i think what governor romney was saying even president carter who is known not to have
for the united states, and that is a role that is far and beyond politician. -- politicks. citizens -- the department of justice is withholding documents. madam chairwoman, it should not have come to this. there are basic questions that the people in congress should have the right to have answer. who approved the tactic of gun walking? why was the criminal chief advocating for the tactic of gun walking on february 4, 2011, in mexico which is the very same day a demonstrably false letter was written to united states senator chuck grassley denying the tactic? on the very same day one is advocating for it, a letter was sent on department of justice letterhead denying the tactic. how did it ever get drafted and sent on d.o.j. letterhead? was gun walking alluded to in the wiretapping applications? and if so, who missed it? when the president said he did not approve of fast and furious and neither did eric holder, how did he know it? he said that in march of 2011. these are but five questions in a we do not have the answers to despite one solid year of asking. so, madam chairwoman, this
and the end of an era in indiana and washington d.c. as the longest serving republican in the united states senate is ousted from office i stepped on the machine, and it showed me the pressure points on my feet and exactly where i needed more support. i had tired, achy feet. until i got my number. my dr. scholl's custom fit orthotics number. now i'm a believer. you'll be a believer, too. learn where to find your number at drscholls.com. ok! who gets occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas or bloating? get ahead of it! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap a day helps defend against digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. hit me! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. spy. the new york times said that he was an intelligence agent for saudi arabia who volunteer to infiltrate the terror group in yemen. he uncovered a so-called " underwear bomb " designed to pass through airports security. al-qaeda wanted him to where the device onto a plane bound the united states and the fbi now has that bomb. a russian plane believed to have 44 people on bo
as they clean reliable source of energy in the united states. geothermal power is a unique source of renewable natural energy that is the product of heat generated by distorting the earth. your score is continually producing an enormous amount of heat, primarily by means of decay of the materials and secondarily by energy left over from the formation. heat generated in your score is connected upward in the christ under certain geological conditions such as being placed in a shallow chambers about young volcanoes or thinning of the christ in risk, such as occurs in nevada. rock and water and air shallow crust is sometimes heated to a high temperature. surface manifestations of the underlying the geothermal energy range from shallow clock to wander up hot springs. we are all familiar with some of the famous examples of geothermal energy in action such as volcanoes, not st. helens comes to mind. the old faithful guy in yellowstone national park, their hot springs areas. advances in technology harness the heat stirring rock and modern converts electrical power can be used to power cities and indus
immigrants are using this to claim both children in the united states and in mexico with some claiming up to ten children who have never, ever, set foot in the united states. we are talking about not even just sons and daughters but nieces and nephews and it is costing taxpayers $4.2 billion a year. >>eric: do we know how they access the money in they walk into a welfare office and say, by the way i have four or five and here are their names give me my check. >>guest: no this is welfare built in the tax code so they do their taxes they claim all of these people. and that is what they are doing claiming nieces and nephews and some have never been to the united states. >>eric: so, harry reid, senator harry reid, he said that he wants to block efforts do make that illegal. how is he doing that? >>guest: so, senator sessions and vitter put together a plan that would require individuals to give a social security number so the inspector general and department of treasury said the best way to combat the fraud is to require individuals to give their social security number so that is what the sena
manually by people and great control centers all over the united states. they were 21st day, seven days a week and they have to maintain the balance on a minute by minute basis all throughout the day. the second thing we need to learn is that his technology can fail for a really long time and still end up becoming something completely ubiquitous to the way we live. i think there's a lot of analogies between the history of the life of an history of solar power because i've had people tell me, while solar cells were invented in 1840s, people out pushed this is the energy solutions the 1970s, but they're still expensive and so not really widely used, so clearly they are a failure and we should move on. if you look at the history of the label, you can see technology can fill on a technological basis for 80 years hentgen fail for another 40 and still end up having something we are completely dependent upon today. finally, we need to learn that it changes the completely sweep the nation are not necessarily things that happened individual by individual. we don't have an electric grid system to
karzai is here in the united states and is said to be launching a charm offensive. he is best known for periodic jabs and his nato allies, but he is embarking on a charm offensive as he faces the prospect of fleeing troops and possibly dollars -- let's listen to what president karzai had to say in chicago. [video clip] >> afghanistan reaffirms its commitment to the transition process and to the completion of it in 2013. and the withdrawal of our partners in 2014, so that afghanistan is no longer a burden on the shoulder of friends in the international community or the shoulders of the united states and our other allies. afghanistan, as you actually put it, mr. president, " looks forward to an end to this war and a transformational decade in which afghanistan will be working further for institution building and the development of sounder government in the country. host: that was the afghan president for the nato summit in chicago yesterday. we are getting some tweets and you can join that conversation. joseph writes -- --e's the baltimore sun and we see some images in the newspapers
, on the shoulders of the united states and our other allies. afghanistan is looking forward to an end to this war and the transformation in which afghanistan will be working forward for institution building and development of the government in the country. host: we're getting some tweets and you can join the conversation. host: here is "the baltimore sun" -- >> you can see "washington journal" every morning beginning at 7:00 p.m. eastern. we're going back to the small business administration conference. this is karen mills. >> i want to start now -by giving my thanks and ask you to join me a warm set of thanks to my colleague, our deputy administrator. thank you. if you think i travel a lot to your regions, they are out every single week and doing the work of this agency. this is a ground game, we call a it. we have i think really enjoyed meeting all of you out in your respective areas and regions and visiting your businesses. today it is more of a pleasure to. have you here with us. this is my chance to talk to you about everything that has been going on in the world of small business. i think t
-sighted policy for the united states not to be involved with the private sector. now, as to the private sector, the amount of money we have at the federal level for africa is about $8 billion. the amount of money to be made helping the african people is hundreds of billions of dollars. the number of jobs to be created in america helping the african continent is millions of jobs. and we need you. we need you more than ever. so this partnership that we're talking about today is the future. no more money to dictators. money goes to people, and through the private sector it's going to get its best rate of return. now, my job was to and is to introduce secretary clinton. all i can say is that if you had to pick a person to tell the american story in africa or anywhere else -- and god knows we have our political differences, i have to say that. [laughter] for her own sake and mine. [laughter] but here's where we have a lot of commonality. she's dedicated to her job, she loves her country, and she understands the issues, and there are a lot of them in her job to understand. but more importantly, i th
that diplomatic standoff between the united states and china is finally coming to an end. at the center of it is the chinese human rights dissident chen guangcheng. he escaped from house arrest two weeks ago, was rescued by u.s. diplomats, and then with secretary of state clinton in beijing for talks, he was returned to the chinese. chen is still in a hospital being treated for a foot injury that he suffered in his escape. david martin picks up the story. >> reporter: just when it looked like the chen case was about to cause a major rupture in u.s.- chinese relations, secretary of state clinton wrapped up her tumultuous visit to beijing by announcing a deal that seemed to meet his latest demands. >> i'm pleased that today our ambassador has spoken with him again. our embassy staff and our doctor had a chance to meet with him. and he confirms that he and his family now want to go to the united states so he can pursue his studies. >> reporter: that after a day in which chinese police had ringed the hospital where chen was undergoing medical tests. when u.s. officials drove up to check on
to believe that ten years after the war in afghanistan started after 9/11 the president of the united states still can't arrive under normal circumstances. >> reporter: it was pretty hard to hide the president of the united states. >> reporter: the president signed a strategic partnership agreement with afghan president hamid karzai. he spent only an hour on the ground in kabul and then quickly departed again in the dark. >> reporter: i would just point out we are hearing helicopters again over kabul, suggesting perhaps some transportation and i don't know if that's the president leaving the presidential palace at this point. >> reporter: after rallying the troops -- >> this outpost is more than 7,000 miles from home. >> reporter: the president addressed the nation from bagram air base and board the air force one just before 4:30 a.m. local time. >> there was a real stampede to the airplane at that point because the sun was just, you know, beginning to come up and they really wanted the president out of there while it was still mostly dark. so from the time he finished his address to the tim
pennsylvania, thaddeus stevens, he's an abolitionist. in the 1850s the united states senator from massachusetts, charles sumner, although there are still abolitionists who say this is a mistake, the abolitionists are focused on the goal of ending slavery, but they do have some rather spirited internal debates about how to do that. they also debate the role of women. and believe it or not, some abolitionist men said that female abolitionists were hurting the cause, that they were distracting people from the important issue, that they were discrediting the movement. frederick douglass and william lloyd garrison said no, they're n not. they advocated the right of women to participate in the movement. so let's talk more about some of the female abolitionists, shall we? these are very interesting people who have been the subject of some really excellent biographies. the grinke sisters of south carolina. and grimke is a french name. their ancestors were french protestants who came to south carolina in the colonial period. the family by the early 19th century was very wealthy. they had a beautiful hou
to the united states. instead, he handed over the new and improved al qaeda underwear bomb and is in the hands of the fbi. what authorities do not know is who leaked the top secret operation and why. some say future spy separatioop could be in jeopardy. >>> russia's newest civilian passenger jet, one of the planes took off from an airport in indonesia on a demonstration flight. it was supposed to return after 30 minutes. it did not and now there has been no contact with the pilot. at least 37 people were on board. there's no word on what has happened. >>> same-sex couples in north carolina are facing uncertainty today after voters approved a constitutional ban on gay marriages. >> let no one define your marriage for you. >> opponents say the ban amounts to discrimination. the amendment defines marriage as between a man and a woman. the head of the group that supported the amendment says, quote, we are not anti-gay. we are pro-marriage. 61% voted for the amendment, 39% voted against it. >>> and a bomb went off in syria today near a convoy carrying united nations observers. none of the u.n. team
will double from 3.4% to 6.8%. on july 23, the president of the united states stood on that podium and challenged congress to avoid that rate increase from going through and for three months we had a republican majority which stonewalled this issue, no markup, no hearing. i filed legislation the day after that speech, we have over 150 co-sponsors to permanently lock in the lower rate and yet as mr. miller indicated, what we heard from the house republicans was a bill 10 days ago which bypassed committee, nothing from the education work force committee, rammed through the rules committee and paid for in the most disgraceful, grotesque fashion, taking it out of a fund, wiping out a fund to pay for prevention of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, early childhood diseases. that is not a solution, the president made it clear when that, you know, scam was presented that it would be vetoed immediately. it is a dead letter, it is time for us to, yes, debate a c.g.s. appropriations bill, very important, but those kids, those families need a horizon before them as they deal one -- with one of
in the united states represented. of course there are people from other traditions as well who are doing heroic work in the battle for religious freedom. we could expand the panel if we have more space and more time. one thinks of islamic figures for the back of fund for religious freedom t --eh beckett fund for religious for, members sikh fund. this is a cause that unites us across christian and judeo- christian lines but even more broadly. with that, let's have a little discussion appear on the panel and then, i understand, you will have the opportunity to send some questions up from the audience. if i could begin, i was struck by something that c shipor teleone said. catholics had to work toward a truly robust understanding of religious liberty that embraces the broader principles of democratic-republican government. my own sense of that and i would be curious to know your perspective is that part of it had to do with what the for raised"religious liberty" meant to a church whose hierarchy for a long time really was european. the experience of the french revolution really shaped the idea tha
and singapore and around the united states and said, gosh, in the schools the highest performing in the world, their classroom sizes are about the same in the united states. >> did he say around the world? you mean mitt romney has a worldly view of education and not american? in other words, forget the real life experiences of teachers in the classroom, mitt romney will liston what a think tank tells him. he doesn't have to do anything and he doesn't know anything about overcrowding or underfunding when it comes to schools and what it will do to them. romney doesn't seem to care, just like he didn't care when he was the governor of massachusetts. in his first year, romney cut education funding to close a $1.2 billion budget gap. the cuts caused local taxes to go up. they also caused layoffs of more than 14,000 teachers, police officers, librarians and other public employees. in 1999, mitt romney said, we don't need to spend more on education. in his book titled "no apology", romney wrote the effort to reduce classroom size may hurt education more than it helps. this is why there were proteste
bio info in your packets. but he was appoint today the united states court of appeals by george w. bush in 2005, he has a ba from brigham young university, and his jd is from the university of virginia school of law. but most notably, he and his wife are the proud participants of six -- parents of six children and the grandparents of four. we're also particularly thankful to have judge griffith out here since he was at standford only two weeks ago -- stanford only two weeks ago. i don't know if it was us or the weather, but we're glad something could entice him to cock back a second time. >> -- come back a second time. >> thank you again. thanks to michael, e lan and barbara. although, elan, i wish you hadn't remarked i was out here two weeks ago in many light of mr. gray's comment, last panel that the dc circuit is woefully underworked. [laughter] so good morning. for those of us who are familiar with gatherings of the federalist society, this is the obligatory panel on the part of the constitution that seems to be of the greatest interest to federalist society event organizers e
is now in the united states and came home over -- i shouldn't say home. came to the u.s. over the weekend and became a tugging match between the u.s. and china. here is part of what he told anderson about why he spoke out in the first place. i will quote these back and forth here. quote, natural for me, it was very natural for me. i feel it is in people's nature to want to stop evil and embrace the good. that's a quote and part of the interview transcript. we're working on turning around sound for you, but i can tell you chen talks to anderson about his escape, how that went down, his concern for his family and what it was like to feel the sun for the very first time in quite a long while. again, anderson cooper with that interview. be sure to watch anderson tonight at 8:00 for the full thing. >>> in the meantime a new lead in a case that changed the way america deals with missing children from putting their pictures on milk cartons to parents warning their little ones about stranger danger. i am talking about the 79 disappearance of 6-year-old etan patz who vanished while walking to his
the candidates, for instance, what the relationship will be with the united states after this election or with israel for that matter, many of them will say especially among the islamists they would reconsider perhaps some of the portions of the treaty that is were signed some three decades ago between egypt and israel. as far as the fundamentals, as whether or not the person who wins will rethink entirely or destroy in fact treaties that were signed and that have held for all of these decades t doesn't seem like that's something that's in the cards at all. remember one thing about the united states and this region. the u.s. has some important allies. it is saudi arabia, the gulf nations and very importantly egypt. it is possible, for instance, that there may be some modifications to the way the united states and egypt conduct their affairs or come up with agreements in terms of how they discuss very important strategic matters. the united states needs egypt and in fact egypt needs the united states, so the expectation is not that there will be a dramatic rethinking of that relationshi
. this individual was to be present of the united states has to go into the african-american community and listen and learn as if this is alien territory to he's going to take me your leader. at this point, he should be an informed individual above all segments of american society. this is no time for a president to start discovering a large percentage of the population and try to understand what they are about. he should know. host: this morning tom friedman of "the new york times", says obama is not running on the success he had in key areas including the auto bailout. this comment came on our twitter page. he cannot blame president bush this time. all he can do is blame himself and say he will try harder. what is the president's message and how would you size up his campaign? guest: i think his message will develop during the campaign. he has spent some time recently on bain capital. the objective is to show that mitt romney is not the successful businessman he claims to be. but he will have to talk about his own record, what has happened in the last three years. it seems to me he has some thi
to regain it's place in the world. he decided to have the tallest dome built in the united states. it's now stands 307 feet 6 inches from the ground 40 feet taller than the united states capital. >> you could spend days going around the building and finding something new. the embellishment, the carvings, it represents commerce, navigation, all of the things that san francisco is famous for. >> the wood you see in the board of supervisor's chambers is oak and all hand carved on site. interesting thing about the oak is there isn't anymore in the entire world. the floors in china was cleard and never replanted. if you look up at the seceiling you would believe that's hand kof carved out of wood and it is a cast plaster sealing and the only spanish design in an arts building. there are no records about how many people worked on this building. the workman who worked on this building did not all speak the same language. and what happened was the person working next to the other person respected a skill a skill that was so wonderful that we have this masterpiece to show the world today. >>, to t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 296 (some duplicates have been removed)